Celiac Disease (Newly Revised and Updated): A Hidden Epidemic

Overview

Celiac Disease: A Hidden Epidemic is an indispensable guidebook for anyone with celiac disease as well as for those with gluten intolerance or food sensitivities on a gluten-free diet. Since the last edition in 2016, scientific advances have changed what we know about the disease, how it is diagnosed and treated, and the long-term effect of a gluten-free diet on the brain and body.
Celiac disease is a hereditary autoimmune condition that damages the lining of the small intestine so that it cannot properly absorb food. Without essential nutrients, the entire body begins to suffer. The disease is triggered by gluten, a protein found in wheat, rye, and barley. The only “cure” for the disease is a life-long gluten-free diet. The disease affects nearly 1 in every 100 people in the United States—50 percent of whom remain undiagnosed and untreated. Although the primary target of injury is the small intestine, CD can and often does affect the entire body. Complications from the disease can include infertility, liver disease, osteoporosis, anemia, and other autoimmune diseases (such as Type 1 diabetes and Thyroid disease), neurological conditions, and even cancer.
This updated fourth edition includes the latest information on CD, gluten intolerance, and gluten sensitivity. The important updates cover everything from new testing devices to advances in therapies that may help prevent gluten from ...

Overview

Celiac Disease: A Hidden Epidemic is an indispensable guidebook for anyone with celiac disease as well as for those with gluten intolerance or food sensitivities on a gluten-free diet. Since the last edition in 2016, scientific advances have changed what we know about the disease, how it is diagnosed and treated, and the long-term effect of a gluten-free diet on the brain and body.
Celiac disease is a hereditary autoimmune condition that damages the lining of the small intestine so that it cannot properly absorb food. Without essential nutrients, the entire body begins to suffer. The disease is triggered by gluten, a protein found in wheat, rye, and barley. The only “cure” for the disease is a life-long gluten-free diet. The disease affects nearly 1 in every 100 people in the United States—50 percent of whom remain undiagnosed and untreated. Although the primary target of injury is the small intestine, CD can and often does affect the entire body. Complications from the disease can include infertility, liver disease, osteoporosis, anemia, and other autoimmune diseases (such as Type 1 diabetes and Thyroid disease), neurological conditions, and even cancer.
This updated fourth edition includes the latest information on CD, gluten intolerance, and gluten sensitivity. The important updates cover everything from new testing devices to advances in therapies that may help prevent gluten from ...

Details

Summary

This book evolved from the combination of two sometimes diverse perspectives: that of the doctor and the patient. It incorporates an understanding of both the science and the experience of an illness and the collective knowledge we both have acquired in the process. This revised edition reflects the current developments in a rapidly changing field.
All of the information in this book is based on current knowledge about the causes, manifestations, diagnosis, treatment, and consequences of celiac disease. It is derived from an in-depth analysis of current medical literature, extensive clinical experience, patient and professional interviews, as well as ongoing research into celiac disease and its many complications.
Other medical experts may have differing opinions and interpretations of the medical literature. Wherever pertinent, the authors have attempted to note conflicting points of view on key issues as well as topics that have not as yet been scientifically resolved.
Many of the peer review articles we have consulted may not be readily accessible to all readers. For this reason, we have not included footnotes for all medical facts and figures. Instead, we have listed good basic review articles and books for different subjects in the Appendices.
The personal stories and diagnoses throughout this book are based primarily on the patient population seen at the Celiac Disease Center at Columbia University.
The population of the greater New York tri-state area is very large and ethnically diverse. Also, the patients who seek help at a major medical center may present with more severe and complex symptoms. We understand that this may or may not be typical of the celiac profile in any given city or region of the United States. Nevertheless, we feel that the cross-section of patients chosen for this book reflects the face of celiac disease in the United States today.

Contents

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